As I read PUNCHING THE AIR. I ended up stopping a few times. I needed to take a moment to let a portion of the messages sink in rather of sort of humming past them to perceive what occurred straightaway.

I truly loved Amal and particularly the depictions of his fine art. His associations with his loved ones felt genuine and complex. His relationship with his mother got me the most, I think. It wasn’t the essential one in the story, but I had an inclination that it was so nuanced and had every one of these layers of him growing up and her wanting to protect him yet not having the option to and realizing she was unable.

Truly, that sort of layering and the manner in which the characters’ feelings connect and grab you fills each scene in this book. It’s distinctive. It’s ground-breaking. This is the sort of book that keeps you reading until late into the evening and you awaken thinking about it. I thought it was ground-breaking that the authors decided to write this story about a kid who isn’t 100% at the wrong place at the wrong time, done nothing wrong.

This isn’t a tale about a white child framing a dark child for something he didn’t do. PUNCHING THE AIR is a story about boys in a fight and the gross irregularity between the manner in which the system treats those boys dependent on the shade of their skin.

From the start, I needed it to be more the formal kind of story. That makes it more agreeable. There’s a casualty. There’s a culprit. The lines are totally clear. It’s basic. It’s agreeable. Yet, that sort of story would overlook the way that none of us are great. We as a whole commit errors. We shouldn’t need to be perfect to be dealt with fairly and with respect and pride.

I watched the connections among Amal and his teacher and counsellor in prison. It was heart-breaking how regularly they seemed like they had good intentions but caused him hurt. Or then again they seemed as they didn’t actually see him and didn’t know about the impact their activities and words had on him. That truly hit me hard, on the grounds that it made me think about how often I’ve been that individual saying a good meaning thing that is deeply hurtful, or worse, harmful.

PUNCHING THE AIR features the way that the variations in our justice system don’t start with an arrest. Furthermore, they don’t end there, either. I guess this book caused me to sit with those disparities and truly take a look at how this damages individuals and causes deep harm. The story is so open. You don’t need to be a specialist to follow or understand. It doesn’t beat you over the head with governmental or issues. The writer just tells a ground-breaking tale about boys who committed errors and how they’re dealt with afterword.

PUNCHING THE AIR is totally worth reading. I think fans of Jacqueline Woodson and Jason Reynolds will truly enjoy it, and I think everybody should read it.

Podcast ( Punching the Air : By – Ibi Zoboi and Yusef Salaam )

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