Winterkeep   is the fourth novel in Kristin Cashore’s Graceling series. More I read this novel, more I like it. It takes Bitterblue to another realm, where she attempts to discover how two of her envoys died. The cast is enormous and the book utilizes various points of view, with each point of view character being all around developed.

Winterkeep is a complicated story and over the span of telling it, Cashore raises various questions, for example, the need to care for the environment. The trouble of telling politics from the craving for cash, and the basic to be each other’s keepers. In “Winterkeep” Kristin has extended this fascinating world even more. Welcome to Winterkeep with silbercows, telepathic blue foxes, and zilfium, a kind of rock that can cause pollution.


Perhaps of all the topics the topic I discovered most intriguing was the positive treatment of sex, especially for ladies. Given our Puritan and patriarchal legacy, this sort of sex positivity is hard for an author to achieve. All things considered, we authors come from that legacy as well. In any case, we see the 23-year-old Bitterblue picking whom to have sex with, apparently without punishment or outrage. Furthermore, we see 16-year-old Lovisa and her classmates building up their feeling of sexual inclination, duty, and morals. They use birth control and felt regretful when they use someone. Also judge each other for how they treat previous sex partner. They accept young girls are also entitled to pleasure.

As an author, I additionally discovered Cashore’s utilization of our slang to be worth noting. A few authors stay away from it, in the conviction that it will break the illusion of being in an alternate world. My hypothesis is that whatever language the characters are talking, it’s not English. Their language, similar to all languages, will have a scope of registers, so they will have slang, and we can best “interpret” that by utilizing our own slang.

Book Review Podcast ( Winterkeep: Book by Kristin Cashore )