By – Susan Wiggs

The Lost and Found Bookshop was a well written story about the present, the past, and the possibilities of the future. The bookshop setting pulled me in immediately, and I could envision myself nestled into the comfortable seats and seats by the window, with the San Francisco roads and scenes around me. I needed to join these characters as they explored their general surroundings… and through the books they read.

There is a book for everything . . . Some place in the immense Library of the Universe, as Natalie considered it, there was a book that embodied precisely the things she was agonizing over.

In the wake of a terrible misfortune, Natalie Harper acquires her mom’s enchanting however monetarily lashed bookshop in San Francisco. She likewise becomes caretaker for her feeble granddad Andrew, her lone living family member—not including her scalawag father.

However, the gruff, profoundly kind Andrew has started to show indications of decline. Natalie believes it’s ideal to move him to a assisted living office to guarantee the care he needs. To pay for it, she intends to close the book shop and sell the broken down yet important building on notable Perdita Street, which needs steady fixing. There’s just a single issue Grandpa Andrew possesses the structure and won’t sell. Natalie adores her granddad; she’ll take the necessary steps to make his last years happy. Plus, she loves the store and its books give welcome comfort to her staggering sorrow.

After she moves into the little studio apartment over the shop, Natalie completes her granddad’s request and recruits temporary worker Peach Gallagher to do the important and progressing fixes. His daughter, Dorothy, also comes consistent at the bookshop, She and Natalie start reading together while Peach works.

Amazingly Natalie’s sorrow starts to scatter as her life turns into a surprising excursion of new discoveries, connection and disclosures, from uncovering artefacts covered up in the bookshop’s walls, to finding reality with regards to her family, her future, and her own heart.

Natalie was a character I appreciated, and I was pulling for her as she experienced her misfortunes and began once again in her mom’s bookshop. The extraordinary “jack of all trades” who helped fix the shop was somebody I would have wanted to know, as well, and I delighted in viewing Natalie gradually come to connect with him. The well-known writer who came to do a book signing to help them with bringing more customers was great, as well, with his secrets and sorrows.

Dorothy was a particularly wonderful young character, and I trusted she would consistently be a part of Natalie’s life.

The lost things found inside the shop ended up being an extraordinary lift to the characters’ lives and to the story. I realized a cheerful ending was coming. I cherished this book and didn’t have any desire to leave the characters behind.

Podcast ( The Lost and Found Bookshop : By – Susan Wiggs )