Cinderella is Dead is a brilliant take on the story we all know. The world building and plot of “Cinderella is Dead” were incredible. The author (Kalynn Bayron) acquired some fascism qualities from North Korea, (for example, hanging the dear leader’s picture in each resident’s home) and made a dystopia culture where ladies are second-class people and all that they have really belongs to either their spouses or fathers. Some are dealt with no better than slaves, and all are viewed as property. The fantasy of Cinderella has been turned and is utilized as both purposeful publicity and religion, teaching females they are simply fit to serve their “Prince Charming.” To oppose the law is to challenge the lord’s vanity, and the punishment is death. Nobody dares to disobey, and nobody can get away, until Sophia.

The plot of “Cinderella is Dead” rotates around a young woman longing to break the cycle. Every year women are gathered together like cattle and in a real sense sold at a ball, where their families dress them in the best outfits cash can purchase, because nobody has seen the divine godmother of yore for years. The expectation is that they will each be picked by a wealthy husband. Sophia has more reason to worry than most, not only because she is in love but because she is a lesbian.

I picked this novel based on the cover art and title alone. At that point I had no clue it had a LGBT romantic tale in it, so that was a surprise. I loved the plot and it moved quick. There is a conspiracy with respect to the first story of Cinderella’s life that includes her family and its heirs. As well as her marriage with Prince Charming and how he dealt with her. It was so complex and brilliant. However, this is the first novel by the author and it is not without flaws.

I think where “Cinderella is Dead” was somewhat lacking was in its characters. A significant number of them are cookie-cutter types and do not create or genuinely show their characters. One girl exists just to be a saint; another, to be a jealous, angry ex. They fill a purpose however do not appear like genuine people themselves. Moreover, afterwards there are some that appear to switch characters.

A few occasions additionally appear to be silly. Sophia and Constance are on the road and take a horse and truck to carry a small quantity of supplies which they later carry on their backs, when the truck is stuck in the forest. Also, no notice at all is made of really focusing on the horse. They did not give the horse anything to eat or drink and ran it through the forested areas throughout the day with not a single water supply to be found? It is simply not realistic.

While the characterization in this story was feeble to the extent of the main character’s inspirations and the side’s character personalities, the plot was a decent one, including wizardry and magic and even a zombie or two. I could not totally ignore the flaws, however I could undoubtedly appreciate the story regardless of its weaker points. “Cinderella is Dead” is a book I would like to reread and would recommend to fans of young adult fiction, particularly as fantasy retelling.

Podcast ( Cinderella Is Dead : By – Kalynn Bayron )