By – Diana Pinguicha

A CURSE OF ROSES was totally superb, heart-breaking, and cheerful at the same time. Recreating the tale of Saint Elizabeth of Portugal, A Curse of Roses borrows from real-world faith while including very real LGBT emotions, and internalized homophobia, Yzabel should arrive at terms with before the end. The book handles subjects of strict devotion, supernatural occurrences and their ethical uncertainty, homophobia, and sexism. Yzabel is pledged to the lord of Portugal and lives in the castle with him in the number one spot up to their wedding. Due to her curse where she transforms food into roses, Yzabel eats practically nothing, starving herself such a lot of that she no longer gets her month to month courses.

She has attempted self-lashing and actual torment as strategies to keep the curse under control, however it appears to just deteriorate. At the point when her servant recommends she looks for a Moura, Yzabel takes the risk, trusting that mystical Moura will concede her desire of eliminating the curse. When she finds the Moura, Fatyan, she clarifies that a fix isn’t so basic. In any case, she vows to help her if Yzabel assists with breaking her curse – with a kiss. Yzabel is torn about this offensive demonstration, however she at last kisses her, feeling things that cause expanding internal disturbance.

What I liked about “A CURSE OF ROSES” : This is a truly intense story with a ton of inward battle. The start is somewhat scattered, However it starts to truly come to shape about 1/3rd of the way through. The subjects are dark however captivating. There is a great deal about acknowledgment of LGBT people and the battles they face for living their realities. There are likewise captivating conversations and symbolism around ethical quality and religion. Yzabel learn from Fatyan that her curse could be seen contrastingly by alternate points of view just as that the religious texts are not as straightforward as she had suspected. The focal point through which sorcery (or wonders) and religion is seen matters.

What left me needing more in “A CURSE OF ROSES” : As a significant number of the battles are inward, I needed to hear a greater amount of Yzabel’s progressions and how she grapples with herself and her own certainties – I figure this would have been better in a first individual story to truly get drenched into Yzabel’s mentality and musings. As a little point, the starting felt somewhat scattered, and it was hard for my to balance in the story with various enchantment, plagues, etc. This was a little point, as it truly solidified later in the story, and the ending was solid.

A CURSE OF ROSES” is a fascinating, dark young adult historical fantasy.