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15 Longest Movie Names (Titles)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles)

Movie titles are the first thing that attracts our attention when we plan to watch a film. It is interesting how the title of a movie can make or break its success. Some titles are simple, catchy, and easy to remember, while others are lengthy, elaborate, and perhaps more challenging to recall. In this article, we will explore the world of cinema’s longest movie titles, ranging from the weird and wacky to the serious and poignant. So, get ready to read about 15 longest names of movie.

Night of the Day of the Dawn of the Son of the Bride of the Return of the Revenge of the Terror of the Attack of the Evil, Mutant, Hellbound, Flesh-Eating Subhumanoid Zombified Living Dead, Part 3 (1993)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - Night of the Day of the Dawn of the Son of the Bride of the Return of the Revenge of the Terror of the Attack of the Evil, Mutant, Hellbound, Flesh-Eating Subhumanoid Zombified Living Dead, Part 3 (1993)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – Night of the Day of the Dawn of the Son of the Bride of the Return of the Revenge of the Terror of the Attack of the Evil, Mutant, Hellbound, Flesh-Eating Subhumanoid Zombified Living Dead, Part 3 (1993)

It is a horror-comedy film from 1993 that parodies B-movie horror films from the 1950s and 60s. The title itself is a tongue-in-cheek reference to the over-the-top and convoluted titles that many of these films had. The movie is a sequel to a previous film with a similar name, and follows the story of a group of teenagers who find themselves in the midst of a zombie invasion. The film is known for its campy humor and low-budget special effects, and has since gained a cult following among fans of the horror-comedy genre.

Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade Peter Brook, (1967)

Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade Peter Brook, (1967)
Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat As Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade Peter Brook, (1967)

It is a play written by Peter Weiss and adapted into a film by director Peter Brook in 1967. The story is set in a historical French mental institution in the late 18th century, where the Marquis de Sade stages a play about the French Revolution for the inmates, depicting the assassination of Jean-Paul Marat by Charlotte Corday. The play explores themes of power, oppression, and revolution, and raises questions about the role of art in society. The film is a thought-provoking and often intense portrayal of the human condition, with a strong emphasis on the psychological and philosophical aspects of the story.

On the Marriage Broker Joke as Cited by Sigmund Freud in Wit and Its Relation to the Unconscious, or Can the Avant-Garde Artist Be Wholed? (1977)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - On the Marriage Broker Joke as Cited by Sigmund Freud in Wit and Its Relation to the Unconscious, or Can the Avant-Garde Artist Be Wholed? (1977)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – On the Marriage Broker Joke as Cited by Sigmund Freud in Wit and Its Relation to the Unconscious, or Can the Avant-Garde Artist Be Wholed? (1977)

A film by avant-garde filmmaker Owen Land, released in 1977. The movie consists of a series of vignettes, each one exploring a different aspect of the titular joke cited by Sigmund Freud. The film uses a range of experimental techniques, including unconventional editing, distortion of sound and image, and the incorporation of text and narration. The movie raises questions about the nature of humor, the relationship between art and psychology, and the role of the avant-garde artist in society. It is a challenging and thought-provoking work that rewards close attention and reflection.

Othon, or: Eyes Do Not Want to Close at All Times, or, Perhaps One Day Rome Will Allow Herself to Choose in Her Turn (1970)

Othon, or: Eyes Do Not Want to Close at All Times, or, Perhaps One Day Rome Will Allow Herself to Choose in Her Turn (1970)
Othon, or: Eyes Do Not Want to Close at All Times, or, Perhaps One Day Rome Will Allow Herself to Choose in Her Turn (1970)

The movie is an adaptation of a play by Pierre Corneille and explores the themes of power, politics, and betrayal in ancient Rome. The story follows the character Othon, a young Roman general, who struggles to reconcile his love for his wife with his ambition to gain power and prestige. The film is a slow, meditative piece that uses long takes and static camera shots to create a contemplative atmosphere. It is a masterful example of minimalist filmmaking and an exploration of the complexities of human nature.

Réfutation de tous les jugements, tant élogieux qu’hostiles, qui ont été jusqu’ici portés sur le film “La Société du spectacle” Guy Debord, (1975)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - Réfutation de tous les jugements, tant élogieux qu’hostiles, qui ont été jusqu’ici portés sur le film “La Société du spectacle” Guy Debord, (1975)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – Réfutation de tous les jugements, tant élogieux qu’hostiles, qui ont été jusqu’ici portés sur le film “La Société du spectacle” Guy Debord, (1975)

A French film by Guy Debord, released in 1975. The film is a critique of modern society, its media, and its culture. It challenges the dominant narrative of consumerism and mass media by arguing that the world we live in is not one of authentic human experience but rather one of spectacle, where everything is reduced to a series of images and symbols. The film is a thought-provoking and radical exploration of the modern condition, and its influence can still be felt in contemporary discussions about media, society, and power.

Powers of Ten is a short documentary film created by the husband-and-wife design team, Charles and Ray Eames, (1977)

Powers of Ten is a short documentary film created by the husband-and-wife design team, Charles and Ray Eames, (1977)
Powers of Ten is a short documentary film created by the husband-and-wife design team, Charles and Ray Eames, (1977)

The film explores the concept of scale, starting from an aerial view of a couple having a picnic in Chicago and gradually zooming out to reveal the entire universe, and then zooming back in to the subatomic level. As the film moves through different powers of ten, it showcases the vast differences in scale and perspective that exist in the universe, from the subatomic to the cosmic. The film was widely praised for its innovative visual effects and its ability to convey complex scientific concepts in an accessible and engaging manner, making it a classic of science communication.

The Fable of the Kid Who Shifted His Ideals to Golf and Finally Became a Baseball Fan and Took the Only Known Cure Unknown (1916)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - The Fable of the Kid Who Shifted His Ideals to Golf and Finally Became a Baseball Fan and Took the Only Known Cure Unknown (1916)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – The Fable of the Kid Who Shifted His Ideals to Golf and Finally Became a Baseball Fan and Took the Only Known Cure Unknown (1916)

This is a silent comedy short film released in 1916. Directed by and starring John Bunny, the film is a humorous satire on the fickle nature of sports fandom. The story follows a young boy who starts out as a golf enthusiast but eventually becomes a baseball fan. The film pokes fun at the idea of changing one’s interests and passions, as well as the ridiculous lengths some people will go to in order to cure their obsessions. Despite its age, the film provides a humorous and relatable commentary on the nature of sports fandom that is still relevant today.

Homework, or How Pornography Saved the Split Family from Boredom and Improved their Financial Situation Jaime Humberto Hermosillo (1991)

Homework, or How Pornography Saved the Split Family from Boredom and Improved their Financial Situation Jaime Humberto Hermosillo (1991)
Homework, or How Pornography Saved the Split Family from Boredom and Improved their Financial Situation Jaime Humberto Hermosillo (1991)

The movie is a dark comedy that tells the story of a dysfunctional family living in Mexico City. The father is an unemployed alcoholic, the mother is an unfulfilled housewife, and the daughter is a rebellious teenager. When the father discovers that he can make money by making and selling pornographic films, the family’s financial situation improves, but it also causes tension and conflict within the household. The film explores themes of family dynamics, sexuality, and the consequences of desperation and greed. “Homework” received critical acclaim and is considered one of Hermosillo’s best films.

Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, or How I Flew from London to Paris in 25 hours 11 Minutes (1965)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, or How I Flew from London to Paris in 25 hours 11 Minutes (1965)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines, or How I Flew from London to Paris in 25 hours 11 Minutes (1965)

A British comedy film directed by Ken Annakin and released in 1965. The movie is set in 1910 and follows a group of eccentric pilots from different countries who compete in a race from London to Paris, using various innovative flying machines. The film features an ensemble cast, including Stuart Whitman, Sarah Miles, and James Fox. The movie was a critical and commercial success, praised for its impressive aerial sequences, humor, and nostalgic portrayal of the early days of aviation. The film was also nominated for an Academy Award for Best Original Song.

The Fable of the Throbbing Genius of a TankTown Who Was Encouraged by Her Folks Who Were Prominent (1916)

The Fable of the Throbbing Genius of a TankTown Who Was Encouraged by Her Folks Who Were Prominent (1916)
The Fable of the Throbbing Genius of a TankTown Who Was Encouraged by Her Folks Who Were Prominent (1916)

It is a short silent film directed by Earl Hurd and released in 1916. The film tells the story of a young woman from a small town who is encouraged by her family, who are wealthy and influential, to pursue her dreams of becoming an artist. Despite facing criticism and ridicule from the townspeople for her unconventional ideas and approach to art, the woman persists and eventually achieves success in the big city. The film features animated intertitles and was one of the first animated films to use cel animation techniques. Although not well-known today, the film is significant in the history of animation and as an early example of feminist themes in cinema.

The Man with the Smallest Penis in Existence and the Electron Microscope Technician Who Loved Him (2003)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - The Man with the Smallest Penis in Existence and the Electron Microscope Technician Who Loved Him (2003)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – The Man with the Smallest Penis in Existence and the Electron Microscope Technician Who Loved Him (2003)

This is a short film directed by Patrick O’Brien and released in 2003. The film is a quirky and offbeat romantic comedy that tells the story of a man with a condition that has left him with the smallest penis in existence and an electron microscope technician who falls in love with him. Despite the man’s condition, the two develop a deep connection and embark on a heartwarming and unconventional romance. The film is a unique take on the romantic comedy genre and has gained a cult following for its irreverent humor and sweet, heartfelt message about the power of love to overcome all obstacles.

Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex, Drugs and Rock ‘N’ Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (2003)

Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex, Drugs and Rock 'N' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (2003)
Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex, Drugs and Rock ‘N’ Roll Generation Saved Hollywood (2003)

Documentary film directed by Kenneth Bowser and released in 2003. The movie explores the New Hollywood era of American filmmaking, which began in the late 1960s and lasted through the 1970s. The film is based on the book of the same name by Peter Biskind and features interviews with several prominent directors, producers, and actors of the time, including Martin Scorsese, Francis Ford Coppola, and Dennis Hopper. The documentary examines how this new generation of filmmakers revolutionized Hollywood by breaking away from the traditional studio system, creating more personal and independent films, and tackling controversial subjects such as sex, drugs, and politics. The film offers a fascinating glimpse into a pivotal moment in American cinema history.

I Killed My Lesbian Wife, Hung Her on a Meat Hook, and Now I Have a Three-Picture Deal at Disney (1993)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - I Killed My Lesbian Wife, Hung Her on a Meat Hook, and Now I Have a Three-Picture Deal at Disney (1993)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – I Killed My Lesbian Wife, Hung Her on a Meat Hook, and Now I Have a Three-Picture Deal at Disney (1993)

This film directed by Ben Affleck and released in 1993. The title itself is meant to be shocking and provocative and is often cited as an example of how a title can generate buzz and attention for a film. The movie itself is a black and white satire that follows the life of a man who is obsessed with becoming a successful filmmaker. Throughout the film, the protagonist narrates his story in a deadpan and humorous tone, detailing his rise to fame after committing a heinous crime. The film was made as a student project and has gained notoriety over the years for its controversial title and subject matter.

The Saga of the Viking Women and their Voyage to the Waters of the Great Sea Serpent Roger Corman (1957)

The Saga of the Viking Women and their Voyage to the Waters of the Great Sea Serpent Roger Corman (1957)
The Saga of the Viking Women and their Voyage to the Waters of the Great Sea Serpent Roger Corman (1957)

he movie follows a group of Viking women who set out on a dangerous journey to rescue their men who have been captured by a group of barbarians. Along the way, they encounter a giant sea serpent, which they must defeat in order to reach their destination. The film features themes of bravery, loyalty, and adventure, and is notable for its depiction of strong female characters in a genre that was typically male-dominated. While not a critical or commercial success at the time of its release, the film has gained a cult following over the years for its campy charm and unique blend of action and fantasy elements.

The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies Ray Dennis Steckler, (1964)

15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) - The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies Ray Dennis Steckler, (1964)
15 Longest Movie Names (Titles) – The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies Ray Dennis Steckler, (1964)

It is a low-budget horror film directed by Ray Dennis Steckler and released in 1964. The movie revolves around Jerry, a man who visits a carnival and is hypnotized by a performer named Madame Estrella. Jerry becomes a pawn in a plan to turn people into zombies and feed them to a cannibalistic monster. The film’s plot and characters are bizarre, and the production quality is often criticized. Despite its shortcomings, the movie has gained a cult following for its campy humor and over-the-top gore. It has been referenced in pop culture and is considered an example of a “so-bad-it’s-good” film.

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